Heritage Bulletin blog

Heritage Bulleting the Blog

Keep up to date with the latest news and happenings at the Archive and Heritage Collection. Send us your email address to receive notifications of new posts to your inbox, or follow us on twitter.com/RVSarchives

Showing 1-2 results

Nepalese Gurkha Welfare

With the tragedy over the weekend in Nepal we thought we would bring some good news of how the WVS helped the families of Nepalese Gurkha soldiers , a task that would last for over 40 years and how it all started in an account from 1948.

When the decision was made that a Gurkha Brigade would be recruited by the British to serve in Malaya, those responsible felt very strongly that if this experiment were to succeed a welfare service must be provided for the families.

These families had never been out of Nepal in their lives; had probably never seen the sea; had anything from a five to 14 days’ walk to reach the port of embarkation, and could speak no English. To go overseas to live in a strange country with strange people in unknown and unimagined conditions would be a tremendous step.

Early in 1948 WVS agreed to send members to act in a welfare capacity. There are now Families’ Camps attached to the eight battalions serving in Malaya. The families at present live in tents which are wonderfully well kept, and around which little gardens have been planted.

The work of the WVS member varies in each camp, but everywhere a main concern is the health of the women and children. She issues additional milk and vitamin foods, possibly once a week makes an inspection of the tents, weighs the numerous babies, takes the expectant mothers to ante-natal clinic, goes to hospital with all who need treatment, and generally endeavours to reassure the very nervous Gurkha woman and persuade her there is nothing to fear, either in regard to seeing a doctor or going into hospital.

A sewing machine is often provided which the women are taught to use, and the WVS member buys thin material which, in turn, the women buy from her to make light clothes for the children. When the families first arrived the children wore thick, knitted, woollen garments. In a tropical climate the result was very severe prickly heat and often outbreaks of impetigo and other skin diseases. It was not easy to convince the women at first that light clothes were suitable and would be most comfortable, and it was only by getting one or two of the more enterprising of them to try the experiment, which proved successful, that now practically all the women wear light bright coloured saris.

These Gurkha wives are most of them very young people, many of them only 16, 17 or 18.  There are, naturally, some who are considerably older, but for the young ones such a tremendous upheaval must be a startling experience, it is extremely easy to frighten and upset them. By far the chief occupation is having babies!

Every WVS. member feels a tremendous pride in the number and size of the new arrivals, and there is considerable rivalry between the various battalions !

Another activity is running a little class or school for the younger children. It is, naturally, difficult for the WVS member to teach children to count, read and write in a language of which she knows only comparatively few words herself, but nevertheless she manages extremely well by either pointing or drawing an object, the little Gurkha giving the Gurkhali word, the WVS. member giving the English equivalent, thereby both acquiring knowledge at the same time.

The women are on the whole extremely enterprising, very excited with anything new and most receptive to any fresh experience. An outing was once arranged for the wives and families from one camp, On arrival the smaller children walked straight into the sea and started paddling, many of the women immediately took off their top layer of clothes and plunged in in their underclothes. As our WVS member said: “I never thought I would find myself teaching a Gurkha lady to float, with her sari trailing on the waves behind her.”

It is extremely interesting to go round the tents and see what the different families manage to do with the same equipment. Each family is issued with the basic furniture : beds, chairs, tables, chest of drawers. Some remain rather bare and cheerless but others, from apparently nowhere, very soon have many bright flowers about and extraordinary collections of coloured pictures and photographs, and very often an advertisement cut from an illustrated paper appears next door to a brightly coloured picture of a local god.

There is no shadow of doubt that the WVS members working with the Gurkhas have done a really first class job of welfare in the fullest and best sense of the word. The work is exacting and strenuous, but I am sure that everyone who has worked with the Gurkhas is very glad to have had the experience.

Posted by Matthew McMurray at 00:00 Monday, 27 April 2015.

Labels: Nepal, WRVS, RVS, WVS, Gurkha, Soldiers, families, Knitting, Babies, impetigo, hospital, Gurkhali, wool, tents, malaya

Spinach and Beet – Part 8

This month’s extract from the diary of a centre organiser comes from the WVS Bulletin, January 1950:

MONDAY

A young woman brought two little girls, dressed identically, to the Clothing Exchange this afternoon. “Hallo, Twins,” one of our members greeted them. “They’re not twins,” their escort retorted sullenly. “Not -  ?” someone else asked, “but they’re exactly alike. How old are they?” “Same age - six; just a couple of hours difference,” was the answer. We looked at each other in bewilderment. Dressed alike, looking alike, born within two hours of each other and yet not twins ? “This one’s my daughter ; t’other one’s my sister. Me and my Mum, we had ’em the same day,” came the explanation. Our members bustled into activity, endeavouring to fit out aunt and niece!

THURSDAY

A would-be member, Miss Hope Less, for who - so far - we have been unable to find a job (“I’m not really good at anything”) joined a Work Party this afternoon at which we were all busy unravelling old knitted garments prior to re-using the wool. She managed, somehow, to spin a positive cocoon of tangled wool around herself and I could see our efficient Mrs. Wright was itching to get her fingers on to the job. Miss Less, blissfully unaware of the emotions she was rousing, giggled happily at the muddle and said, “‘If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again!’” This was too much for Mrs Wright who swept the wool away from her with fierce possessiveness, muttering as she did so: "‘If at first you don’t succeed’ - try another method!” Hastily suggested a pause for tea.

A JANUARY DINNER (a menu and recipe suggestion from the WVS Bulletin January 1950)

Fish Soup

Wash 1 lb. filleted cod or haddock. Remove skin and bones and put these in a saucepan with cold water to cover and a pinch of salt. Add a small piece of celery, chopped, a small carrot and a little chopped onion. Simmer for one hour and then strain. Put some flour into a basin, allowing 1 tablespoonful to 1 pint of soup. Mix smoothly with a little cold water, stir into the soup and boil for a few minutes, stirring all the time. Add the fish cut up into neat pieces. Simmer for five minutes then add 1/2 pint milk and hot water, and chopped parsley. (This makes an excellent supper dish by itself).

Vegetable Pudding

1 soup-plateful chopped vegetabled
3 soaked dinner rolls
1 1/2 oz. margarine
2 eggs
Salt to taste

Wash and dry and well drain all vegetables before measuring. Drain all moisture from the soaked rolls. Melt margarine in a saucepan and stir in gradually the rolls and prepared vegetables. Mix well then stir in the beaten yolks of eggs. Lastly lightly fold in the frothed whites of eggs. Turn into a buttered pie-dish, dab with pieces of margarine and sprinkle with a little grated cheese. Bake in oven until nicely crisp on top.

Cranberry Tart

3/4 lb. cranberries
1/2 pint water
1/2 lb. brown sugar

Wash and pick over cranberries. Put them on with water and sugar and simmer gently until soft. Break up with a fork and cool. Cover plate with short pastry. Spread over cranberries. Place cross-bars of pastry on top. Sprinkle with sugar and bake in hot oven for 1/2 hour.

For the convalescent: Marmalade rolls

Cut some bread and butter in very thin slices. Spread with marmalade and roll up very carefully. Put in a hot oven for 5 minutes until brown and crackly. A wonderful appetiser at tea-time.

Posted by Matthew McMurray at 00:00 Tuesday, 06 January 2015.

Labels: Spinach and Beet, WVS, WRVS, RVS, Diary, Fish Soup, vegetable Pudding, Cranberry Tart, Work Party, Wool, Twins, Clothing Exchange