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Palatable Pumpkin

It's that time of year when a you see a lot of pumpkins in the supermarkets mostly bought and used for decoration, recently in the news I have seen appeals for people not to just throw away the pumpkin flesh they have carved out. So here are some suggestions from the WVS Bulletin using pumpkins.

PUMPKIN SOUP

Ingredients:
2 lb. pumpkin
1 1/2 pints " household " milk
2 oz. margarine
salt
sugar to taste.

Method:

Peel the pumpkin, cut into dices and put into a saucepan with about 1 pint of water, add a little salt, cook until very tender.

When done, press it through a sieve, add the boiling milk, the fat, some more salt or sugar to taste (sugar preferable if possible). Boil for a few minutes, stirring all the while, and serve. (November 1943)

SAVOURY PUMPKIN PIE

Ingredients:
2 lb. pumpkin cut in thin slices
2 lb. tomatoes
1/2 lb. bread (soaked, drained and beaten with a fork)
1/2 lb. minced meat
1 teaspoonful sweet herbs
2 tablespoonfuls melted margarin

salt, pepper and thick brown gravy.

Method:

Mix the bread, meat, herbs, salt and pepper to a smooth paste with the melted fat.

Put a layer of pumpkin slices at the bottom of a casserole, or pie-dish, add some tomato and top with pumpkin.

Pour in enough gravy to cover the last layer of pumpkin. Cover with greased paper or a lid and bake in a moderate oven for 1 hour. (November 1943)

Alternatively you could make a sweet pumpkin pie...

PUMPKIN PIE

1 1/2 cups cooked and strained pumpkin
3 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon margarine
2 tablespoons molasses (treacle)
1 teaspoon ginger
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 eggs (reconstituted dried)
1 1/4 cups scalded milk.

Simmer pumpkin in as little water as possible for 20 minutes.

Add sugar, margarine, treacle, ginger, cinnamon and salt to pumpkin.

Add egg and milk and mix thoroughly.

Line a tin plate or sandwich tin with pastry and pour in pumpkin mixture and bake in a brisk oven. It is usual not to cover this mixture with another layer of pastry. (November 1942)



Posted by Jennifer Hunt, Deputy Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 31 October 2016.

Labels: Pumpkin, Recipe, WVS, WRVS, Autumn, Bulletin

Ask an Archivist

Last Wednesday was Ask an Archivist day so I thought I would share with you some of the questions sent to us through our enquiry service.

Q: I was wondering if you could tell me when the Clothing Store in Swindon first opened and when it closed?
A: The clothing exchange is first mentioned in 1945 but there is no exact date for when it opened. There are no records for Swindon between 1946 and 1950 (inclusive). When the records reappear in 1951 it appears that the WVS centre in Swindon had been closed at the end of the war and then re-opened in 1951, the Clothing Exchange/Store re-opened in 1953. It is difficult to say when it closed as WRVS had a restructure in 1974 along the lines of the Local Authority and Swindon came under the Thameside District, the district office was in Swindon so I imagine the clothing store was to which is still mentioned in 1992. I imagine it was closed sometime in the late 1990s when WRVS moved its focus to older people’s welfare.

Q: Is there a WVS prayer or hymn?
A:
Yes it was included in the 75th Anniversary Service at St Paul’s Cathedral in 2013

O Lord and Father of all mankind, who has put the spirit of generosity and self-giving into our hearts despite our self-centredness: let thy blessings rest in all its richness upon Royal Voluntary Service and all its volunteers, that strengthened and heartened by the memory and example of their founder they may give themselves for the good of the people of this realm. Grant them the joy which comes from meeting human need and thereby from serving thee; and may the will to give voluntary service, and to give it wisely and well, ever flourish and increase in them, to the benefit of their fellow men and women, and to the glory of thy name, God blessed for evermore. Amen.

Q: I wondered whether there were any historic RVS recipes that matched the classes above, and whether there was a Royal Voluntary Service recipe book or material that I could promote at an agricultural show next weekend?
A: There are a number of recipes in our publications collection which are currently being catalogued, there are also many Civil Defence Recipe cards if you’re thinking of cooking for more than 30 and books like the WRVS Cook Book and Rescue a Recipe which were compiled by our volunteers. You can also search the Bulletins on our Archive Online. For those who enjoy reading are recipes here is one from Rescue a Recipe, 1971.

Yorkshire Fat Rascals

• 1/2lb plain flour
• 2oz lard
• 2tsp sugar
• Little milk to mix
• (few currents or sultanas if preferred)

Rub lard into flour and sugar and mix with milk as if making pastry. Add fruit if used and roll out nearly half an inch thick. Cut into rounds and bake until risen and light brown. Split and butter.

Oven temperature: 400 Regulo 6 Time: about 10 minutes

If you have a burning desire for information about Royal Voluntary Services Archives & Heritage why not get in touch and email archive@royalvoluntaryservice.org.uk


Posted by Jennifer Hunt, Deputy Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 10 October 2016.

Labels: Enquiry, Archivist, WVS , WRVS, Royal Voluntary Service, recipe

Sumptuous sustenance

Tomorrow is Roald Dahl Day, celebrating the birthday of world’s greatest story teller who also wrote Revolting Recipes so this week we thought we would share some wonderful WVS recipes from September 1949.

Food News

Rice, is a good meal extender but do see it is properly cooked. A most enjoyable breakfast dish is Rice and Grilled Sausage. Then there are soups, infinite in variety-and thick soups particularly come into their own at this time of year. Here are suggestions for current menus :

FRENCH LENTIL SOUP

1/2 lb. Lentils                1 tin Tomatoes
1 Onion                           Piece of Margarine
Pepper and Salt            Parsley, chopped

Soak lentils overnight. Put quarter of water and lentils on to boil for 1/2 hour. Add tomatoes and onion and boil for further 1 1/2 hours. Take off and strain. Cook for further 10 minutes. Season to taste and garnish with chopped parsley. Croutons of bread dipped in soup and crisped in the oven make a delicious accompaniment.

BLACKBERRY PUDDING

Stew 2 pints of blackberries and 1/2 lb. brown sugar. Line a pudding basin with thick slices of stale brown bread, crusts removed. Pour in stewed blackberries and cover with bread, then greaseproof paper. Steam for 2 hours. Turn out next day and eat with squeezed lemon.-Cream if you have it.

And for the SPECIAL Occasion

Cook sufficient spinach in its own juice with the addition of just a little butter. When cooked, chop finely, moisten with lemon juice and sharpen up with a little chopped onion and chopped celery. Press into a 1 pint mould which has been buttered and let it get quite cold. Bone a tin of sardines, soak in lemon juice and sprinkle on a little red pepper. Stand the sardines on their heads around the de-moulded spinach and you have an ideal supper dish.

CORRESPONDENCE

In this month one member even wrote in to provide her own recipe advice, I wonder if Charlie Bucket and Willy Wonka would have liked this one.

I am shocked by the recipe for Chocolate Fudge in the July number. The idea of putting in a whole tin of household milk is horrifying and so unnecessary. I append my own very simple recipe which makes a good fudge.

CHOCOLATE FUDGE

8 ozs. sugar. 1/2 to 3/4 oz. of chocolate according to taste. Milk enough to mix to a thin paste (about a teacupful). Heat till sugar is dissolved; then boil for 7 or 8 minutes, till a little put in cold water hardens. Remove from fire and beat in vanilla or almond flavouring and any margarine available (about 1/2 oz.-to 1 oz.). Pour on to buttered plates when thick.

We have submitted this letter to are Food Specialist who replies that some mothers say that they find it difficult to get children to take dried milk in liquid form, but that no child refuses a second piece of fudge.

For the benefit of those who Can get fresh milk, but not dried milk, we have printed this recipe for chocolate fudge.


Posted by Jennifer Hunt, Deputy Archivist at 10:00 Monday, 12 September 2016.

Labels: Recipe, WVS, Chocolate, Bulletin, Roald Dahl, Spinach

Spinach and Beet - Part 17

This month’s diary of a Centre Organiser comes from July 1949

MONDAY
Got chatting to a delightful American airman in the ’bus and found myself inviting him at his own - urgent - request to our Darby and Joan Club. He was an enormous success with the old people (having just the right touch of deference alternating with impudence!) - except, perhaps, in the case of one of our slightly deaf “Joans”. Our visitor, chewing the inevitable gum, sat down opposite her and they gazed at each other in silence for a moment or two. Then “Joan” shook her head resignedly. “It’s very good of you, young man, to try to talk to an old woman,” she told him. “ But I can’t hear a word you’re saying !”

TUESDAY
Could it have been, I wonder, because news of our interest in the prevention of Juvenile Delinquency is becoming known that a woman brought her small son to the office and treated us to a history of his “crimes”? “And yesterday evening, what did he do?” she finished. “Ate the whole of our week’s rations of butter and margarine, a whole fruit cake - and half pound of biscuits (on points, mind you) as well !” “Did you spank him ?” Miss Blank asked her over the top of her typewriter. The woman flushed indignantly. “I don’t believe in corporal punishment,” she declared. “No. I sent him to bed without any supper.”

THURSDAY
Called to see Mrs Matron, mother of four small children, on my way to the office - to explain about a new “Sitter-in” we had found for her. She was hanging out her washing and in addition to clothes, coloured streamers and flags danced gaily on the line in the breeze. “Somebody’s birthday?” I suggested brightly. Mrs Matron laughed and shook her head. “It’s the first time for eight years that there aren’t any nappies on the line,” she said. “I had to celebrate it somehow !” And talking of “ Sitters-in,” Mrs Truefit brought us the following story which she picked up in the uniform department at Tothill Street: - Small boy: “Daddy, when Mummy dies, please will you marry the Sitter-in ?”

Recipe

FRUIT SOUFFLE (Cold)

Cover any fresh soft fruit with sugar and leave to draw the juice. Drain off juice and pass fruit through a wire sieve. Make some custard with a large cup of milk, 1 dessertspoon cornflour, 1 tablespoon sugar and yolk of one egg. Dissolve 3/4 oz. powdered gelatine in a little of the fruit juice. Mix sieved fruit, custard and gelatine together. Beat up the whites of two eggs until stiff and then fold into the fruit mixture very gently. Tie a piece of greased paper round the souffle dish making the paper a few inches higher than the dish. Pour in the souffle mixture and place in the refrigerator until quite firm. Take off paper and decorate with mock cream and glace cherries.

CHOCOLATE FUDGE. (Uncooked).

3 tablespoons cocoa or chocolate powder
1 tin household milk powder
4 tablespoons water
2 oz. margarine
Vanilla
8 oz. sugar

Dissolve the sugar in water in a strong pan over a low heat. Remove from the heat and stir in the margarine. When melted add a small teaspoon of flavouring, together with milk powder and cocoa, previously sieved. Beat until smooth and thick. Pour into a greased tin to get firm. Cut into squares when cold and quite set.


Posted by Matthew McMurray, Royal Voluntary Service Archivist at 00:00 Tuesday, 01 December 2015.

Labels: American Airman, Crimes, Corporal punishments, Sitter in, Nappies, fruit soufle , recipe, chocolate fudge

Spinach and Beet - Part 16

Today’s Diary of a Centre Organiser is from April 1950

Tuesday

A survey of the town has revealed a “corner” of it which is out of reach of any existing Darby and Joan Club. Mrs Ream has energetically pushed a leaflet into the letter-boxes of all houses there known to be inhabited by one or more people over sixty, inviting them to a meeting to discuss the possible formation of a Club. “I’ve been so busy doing this and that, I even forgot to get my husband’s dinner to-day,” she confessed, and added: “He says the leaflets have gone to my head and that I’ve got a one tract mind!”

Wednesday

It is often difficult to curb Mrs Catte’s bitter tongue, but perhaps a newcomer, Mrs Stranger will prove equal to the task. During this afternoon’s Work Party Mrs Stranger - at our invitation - was telling us a little about herself and the work she had been doing for W.V.S. in the Centre she came from. In addition she told us about her son who had won scholarship after scholarship and had just received promotion after only a few months in his first job. “Isn’t it wonderful how lucky your boy is?” Mrs Catte purred silkily, but there was a glint in her eyes. “Yes,” Mrs. Stranger retorted instantly, “isn’t it wonderful? The harder he works the luckier he gets.”

Friday

Sudden outbreak of a particularly nasty type of feverish cold amongst the helpers, coinciding with an unexpected number of requests for “Meals on Wheels” for ex-hospital patients. Everbody - myself included - rushing around madly, trying to cope with the deliveries by car, bicycle and even perambulator. Returned to the office to find amongst the letters one written in the third person : “Mrs Appleton would not mind a ‘Meal’ on a ‘Wheel,’ provided it arrives really hot and that the food is freshly cooked and not merely re-heated. She never touches liver and does not care for steamed puddings.” “Would not MIND ...!!’

Recipe

from May 1950

Meringue Cake

1 1/4 cups plain flour
1/2 cup sugar
1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder
2 egg yolks, unbeaten
1/2 teaspoon salt
7 tablespoons milk
4 tablesp. butter or margarine
1/2 teaspoon vanilla

For meringue top
2 whites of eggs
1/2 cup sugar.

Sift flour once, then measure, add baking powder and salt, sift together three times. Cream butter thoroughly, add sugar gradually, and cream together until light and fluffy. Add egg yolks one at a time, beating after each addition until smooth. Add flavouring. Put into greased baking tin. Beat egg whites until foamy throughout, add sugar, 2 tablesp. at a time, beating after each addition until sugar is thoroughly blended. Continue beating until mixture stands in peaks. Spread over the cake batter. Bake in a moderate oven for about 50 minutes. Let stand for 10 minutes to cool, then remove carefully from cake tin.

Posted by Matthew McMurray, Royal Voluntary Service Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 26 October 2015.

Labels: Meals on Wheels, Darby and Joan Club, Meringue Cake, Recipe, Work Party , leaflets, RVS, WRVS, WVS, Spinach and beet

Spinach and beet - Part 15

In case you had been missing our regular columns over the past month, no fear, the Diary of a Centre Organiser is back! This time from December 1949.

MONDAY

We were asked to visit a woman who is the mother of nine children and who is expecting the tenth within a few days. "I'm dreadfully tired of having babies," she complained.
"Then why don't you stop ?" demanded Mrs Blunt, who accompanied me.
The woman sighed. "It's the only way I know of to keep the youngest from being spoiled," she said.

TUESDAY

When our Regional Administrator paid a visit today to one of our longest-established "Darby and Joan" Clubs she recognised a grey-bearded old man who had told her his age was 77 when she last saw him. "That was four years ago, wasn't it," she suggested, "so now you must be . . . ?"
"77," he maintained solidly.
"But how is that," she asked him." Do explain."
"Explain ?" he spluttered indignantly. "There's nothing to explain. Do I look the sort of chap who would be telling you one thing one day and something else the next ?"

THURSDAY

Our County Organiser passed on an excellent tip she had picked up at the recent conference at Ashridge. "One of our members who distributes Welfare Foods keeps an eye on the laundry lines," a speaker had told the audience, "and directly she sees a row of nappies she calls at the house with orange juice and cod liver oil. It's wonderful how the number of bottles distributed by her has increased since she adopted this plan."

FRIDAY

The Centre has collected a lot of pot plants for distribution at Christmas to the more bedridden of our Meals on Wheels clients - and there will even be some over. A worried-looking man, peering through our window, ventured in to ask if we could let him have a geranium for his wife who was coming out of hospital. "I'm afraid we haven't any geraniums," Miss MacFee told him, "but we have some nice potted chrysanthemums - and here's a very pretty cyclamen."
"No, they won't do," was the gloomy reply. "It's a geranium I promised my wife I'd water for her while she was away."

Recipe

Sultana Cake

1 lb flour
1/2 lb butter or margarine
1/2 lb castor sugar
3 eggs
1/2 lb sultanas
1/4 lb glace cherries
1 teasp Baking Powder
1 breakfastcup milk
Pinch of salt

Cream butter and sugar. Sift in the flour, salt and baking powder. Add eggs one at a time, then the milk. Beat all well together for 10 minutes. Grease and paper a cake tin. Pour in mixture and bake in a moderate oven for 1 1/2 hours. When cool cover with plain white icing and decorate.

Posted by Matthew McMurray, Royal Voluntary Service Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 14 September 2015.

Labels: recipe, Saltana Cake, Welfare Foods, babies, Darby and Joan, Ashridge, meals on Wheels, Geraniums, chrysanthemums, cyclamen, Hospital

Spinach and beet - Part 14

This week's Diary of a Centre Organiser comes from the WVS Bulletin, November 1951

Thursday

Matron is always glad when a young son or daughter, nephew or niece, accompanies one or more of our Trolley Shop team on their weekly rounds at the Old People’s Hospital. The patients enjoy seeing the children and one of them, 86 year old Mr Croke, gives great joy as a rule by moving sideways on his water-bed so that a glup-glup noise is made as he rocks the contents. Today, however, no smile broke the solemnity of a young visitor’s face when Mr Croke did his trick. Instead, overwhelmed with curiosity, the small boy took a step forward and asked anxiously : “If I put my finger in your mouth, would I feel the water?”

Friday

Have not yet found a niche in W.V.S. for Miss Pheckless. Had wondered whether she could deliver some of our Meals on Wheels, but my eye happened to light on an entry for August (when I was away) in our office Day Book which read : “Police called to ask us to remove some containers which had been standing outside No 5 London Street (an empty, boarded-up house) for some days and which were causing annoyance to the neighbours. Sent Miss Brown to collect them.” A later entry stated : “Miss Brown reported the containers were without lids, were buzzing with flies and smelling violently. Have traced that the meals were left by Miss Pheckless instead of at No 5 London Road.” Felt ashamed of myself for not reading the August entries before: what is the use of keeping a Day Book if nobody reads it? Was glad to discover due apologies had been sent to No 5 London Road.

Recipe

Tunny Fish en Casserole

1 medium size tin tunny fish
1 medium size onion (chopped)
3 packets potato crisps
Pepper and salt
1 tin mushroom soup

Line a casserole dish with one packet of potato crisps. Break the tunny fish into small pieces. Place part of it in the casserole, then a small quantity of the chopped onion; repeat until supply of tunny fish and onion are exhausted. Pour into the casserole the tin of soup (which has previously been heated) and put into a moderate oven for about half an hour. Cover the top with a layer of potato crisps, return to the oven for another ten minutes, garnish with parsley and serve.

Posted by Matthew McMurray, Royal Voluntary Service Archivist at 00:00 Tuesday, 11 August 2015.

Labels: WVS, WRVS, RVS, heritage Bulletin Blog, Hospital , Old people, Meals on Wheels , recipe, Tunny Fish casserole, Trolley Shop

Spinach and beet - Part 13

This Month’s extract from the Diary of a Centre Organiser and our recipe come from August 1950.

MONDAY

Found a white-faced Miss MacFee hovering in the doorway when I arrived at the office to-day. “ The telephone’s out of order—and he’s in there,” she flung at me and rushed into the street. A most charming-looking little boy beamed a welcome when, greatly alarmed, I opened the door : his fair, curly hair reminding me of the picture of “ Bubbles ” ; and Miss MacFee’s behaviour seemed unaccountable. However, when I subsequently learned his “history” I felt every sympathy with her and her hurry to telephone the Welfare Officer : the small innocent-eyed person had wrung the neck of a chicken, attempted to strangle a kitten and that morning had nearly throttled his younger brother! (His mother, a Clothing Exchange frequenter, had dumped him on us in despair while on her way to the Hospital with his latest victim.)

TUESDAY

So far the meals for our “ Meals on Wheels ” scheme in the suburb of Nearleigh have been cooked by a local cafe : but with a change of management the quality of them has deteriorated disastrously with a resultant dropping in numbers. Have definitely decided W.V.S. shall do the cooking in future (as we already do for the rest of the town). Proprietor of cafe not pleased at decision and had his own explanation for the fall in numbers : “ They’re so excellent, the meals I serve,” he said aggressively, “ and the old folks feel so much better for them, that that’s why they’re not ordering any more.”

THURSDAY

I realise only too well that I am by no means as efficient as the regular “ Meals on Wheels ” helpers and when I—quite humbly—asked if I should take the place of a member who had fallen out at the last moment I was only “ allowed ” to do so after repeated instructions about bringing back the lids of containers and never leaving a meal without getting the money for it. Was horror-stricken, therefore, when old Mrs. Chaw greeted me with the words : “ It’s my free day to-day ”—but subsequently learned she meant she was free from cooking a meal on Thursdays (and how glad she was to be so), and returned triumphantly with her shilling.

Tomato Puffs

6 firm but ripe tomatoes
Pepper, salt and grated nutmeg
A little melted butter, chopped parsley, chives
1 egg.
Milk
Flour
Fat for frying

Skin the tomatoes and cut into thick slices. Then place on a plate, sprinkling the slices with chives, parsley and nutmeg. Prepare the batter for frying one hour before it is needed. Beat the egg, add a cup of milk and enough flour to make a thick batter. Season well with pepper and salt, adding a spoonful of cold water and melted butter. Beat well. Cover then stand aside.

Have the fat smoking hot : dip the tomato slices in the batter and fry, turning until they become well puffed and a rich golden brown.

Posted by Matthew McMurray, Royal Voluntary Service Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 13 July 2015.

Labels: Tomatoe puffs, recipe, Meals on Wheels, Spinach and beet, WRVS, WVS, Chicken, kitten, Strangulation

Spinach and Beet - Part 12

This month’s extract from the diary of a Centre Organiser came from June 1950

MONDAY

Distribution of Overseas Gift Foods to-day (at the request of the Mayor). Had purposely not sent an invitation to Mrs. Grabber, who has already had more than her fair share. However, she must have got wind of the occasion, for there she was—as usual ! “ No,” she admitted, “ you didn’t send me a card—and it upset me very much.” Then she added, “ But I was not so vexed at not being invited that I wouldn’t come at all ! ”

TUESDAY

Mrs. Kay looked in to thank us for getting her an E.V.W. domestic, and to tell us she is settling down happily. “ Her English is quite good, too,” Mrs. Kay enthused, “ but she mixes up ‘ test ’ and ‘ taste.’ She told me to-day that she thought a plumber should be asked to come along to ‘ taste the drains’!”

WEDNESDAY

An extremely handsome young man brushed past me as I entered the office this morning, and I found Miss Pretty standing by my desk looking flushed. “ What’s been happening here ? ” I enquired briskly. The question was obviously embarrassing. “ Er—that man you saw: he followed me along the street,” she answered. “ Then he came in here to ask if I was doing anything this evening.” “ Well ? ” I prompted, scenting a budding romance. “ When I told him I was free this evening ...” Miss Pretty paused, flashed me a glance and went on quickly : “ He asked me if I would sit-in with his baby so that he and his wife could go to the pictures ! ” (Poor Miss Pretty !)

Rose Custard

Stew 1 pint of raspberries slowly with 1/2 teacupful each of sugar and water. Strain off the juice, measure and make up to 1/2 pint if necessary. Beat 2 eggs, heat 1/2 pint milk and stir it into the eggs, add 1 dessertspoonful of sugar and a pinch of bicarbonate of soda. Leave till lukewarm, then slowly stir in the raspberry juice. If the colour is insipid add a little cochineal. Pour the mixture into a fireproof dish, stand this in a bowl of cold water and put them together into a slow oven. The custard should set firmly without boiling. Turn out when cold and decorate with whole raspberries. Serve with Savoy Biscuits.

Posted by Matthew McMurray, Royal Voluntary Service Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 01 June 2015.

Labels: Rose Custard, Recipe, WRVS, WVS, Baby Sitting, EVW , European voluntary Workers, Overseas Gift Foods, Spinach and Beet

Spinach and Beet - Part 10

This month’s extract from the diary of Centre Organiser come from the WVS Bulletin April 1950, with the recipe from May 1950.

Monday

Tremendous re-organisation beginning in the Clothing Store : all warm garments are being smothered in anti-moth crystals and relegated to the top shelves to make room lower down for more summery ones. Mrs. Bright, who is in charge, shocked her helpers into bust ing activity to-day by saying : “ Here it is Monday morning; to-morrow will be Tuesday, and the next day Wednesday—the week’s half gone, and nothing done. Hurry up, all of you—Hurry ! ”

Wednesday

It is often difficult to curb Mrs. Catte’s bitter tongue, but perhaps a newcomer, Mrs. Stranger will prove equal to the task. During this afternoon’s Work Party Mrs. Stranger—at our invitation—was telling us a little about herself and the work she had been doing for W.V.S. in the Centre she came from. In addition she told us about her son who had won scholarship after scholarship and had just received promotion after only a few months in his first job. “ Isn’t it wonderful how lucky your boy is?” Mrs. Catte purred silkily, but there was a glint in her eyes. “ Yes,” Mrs. Stranger retorted instantly, “ isn’t it wonderful ? The harder he works the luckier he gets.”

Friday

Sudden outbreak of a particularly nasty type of feverish cold amongst the helpers, coinciding with an unexpected number of requests for “ Meals on Wheels ” for ex-hospital patients. Everbody—myself included —rushing around madly, trying to cope with the deliveries by car, bicycle and even perambulator. Returned to the office to find amongst the letters one written in the third person : “ Mrs. Appleton would not mind a ‘ Meal ’ on a ‘ Wheel,’ provided it arrives really hot and that the food is freshly cooked and not merely re-heated. She never touches liver and does not care for steamed puddings.” “ Would not MIND ...!!’

Cheese Mousse.
1 oz. margarine
2 tablespoons flour
1 pint milk

1/2 pint bottled tomato-water

Make this into a sauce. Add as much grated cheese as can be spared—not less than a breakfastcupful—and stir all into a smooth paste. Add 1/2 oz. gelatine dissolved in a little boiling water, mix well to prevent lumps. Allow this to get completely cold, then whip to a spongey consistency.
Having previously prepared a tin of evaporated milk by standing the tin unopened in a pan of cold water, brought to boiling point and boiled for 15 minutes and cooled thoroughly—overnight if possible —whip half a tinful of this milk until stiff. Then combine with the cheese sauce and pour into moulds. Decorate with paprika and parsley.

Posted by Matthew McMurray at 00:00 Monday, 16 March 2015.

Labels: Clothing Store, WVS, WRVS, RVS, Meals on Wheels , cheese Mousse, Recipe