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Game Set Match

After the excitement and perhaps in some cases disappointment of the results of the Wimbledon finals over the weekend I thought you would be interested in reading about WVS/WRVS’s involvement with Wimbledon. A past blog three years ago talked about volunteers running the information desks during the competition in July. This service was in return for the use of the courts for a tournament run in September originally organised by the WVS Club.

On 4th June 1947 the Queen Mother opened the WVS Club at 41 Cadogan Square London/. The club was open to members and ex-members who could apply to join for an annual subscription of £2 2s 2d with a £3 3s 0d entrance fee. It was to be a central meeting place for all members and organised the WVS Tennis Tournament from September 1948 till it closed in 1955.

First held in 1948 the Tennis Tournament was held in September at Wimbledon on the first day WVS supported an American Tournament and on the second day members were invited to play in a ladies doubles competition. In November the following report was printed in the WVS Bulletin:

Although the WVS closed the Tennis continued into the 1980s and possibly 1990s though the last mention in the Archives is the WRVS Association Newsletter No.18 May 1983.

Posted by Jennifer Hunt, Deputy Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 17 July 2017.

Labels: Tennis, WVS, WRVS, Club, Wimbledon

The WVS of Wimbledon are we – Part II

It’s the second and final week of Wimbledon and our story of how the WVS, WRVS and Royal Voluntary Service served Wimbledon continues.

After the war WVS was still going strong but had moved away from its role in supporting a nation at war to sustaining a nation in peace time, proving welfare for older people, taking children on holidays, providing clothing, serving in hospital canteens and helping out in an emergency and Wimbledon volunteers were no different.

In the 1950s Wimbledon WVS were involved in clothing trolley shops, Civil Defence, Meals on Wheels, National Savings and Hospital Services to name a few. As well as the usual activities volunteers were engaged in occupational training clinics, canning fruit and in august 1950 190 tins were completed. Most of our knowledge of their activities comes from the Narrative Reports in March 1950 it was reported that the WVS Exhibition had received a visit from Queen Elizabeth (the Queen Mother) and the Centre Organiser was honoured to be part of her guard. The first coach trips for older people were organised in the mid to late 1950s, mostly residents from the residential homes where the WVS ran trolley shops.

The 1960s and 1970s saw an administrative change for WVS/WRVS Wimbledon as they became part of the London Borough of Merton but they were still as energetic as ever. By this time volunteers were running a Tufty Club, helping with the Sir Winston Churchill Collection Fund, finding a volunteer to take a man with disseminated scoliosis  to the cinema twice a week and arranging for volunteers age 17 to help the housebound with library books and shopping.

Towards the end of the twentieth century WRVS Wimbledon was still doing everything and anything it could to help the people of Merton Borough and further afield. This included helping their fellow volunteers from across the country providing members running the information desks at the Wimbledon tennis championship and those taking part in the WRVS Tennis Competition with accommodation. An unusual request came in 1988 (along with distributing Butter from the EEC) when volunteers were asked to sew badges on to 150 anoraks for the Great British Olympic Team going to Calgary, Canada.

Today Royal Voluntary Service provides services for older people in Wimbledon and all over London including Social Clubs, Good Neighbours and Home Library Services.

Posted by Jennifer Hunt, Deputy Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 04 July 2016.

Labels: WVS, WRVS, Royal Voluntary Service, Wimbledon, Tennis, Post-war

The WVS/WRVS serve at Wimbledon

With the start of the famous tennis tournament today at Wimbledon, we thought it would be good to explore our association with the All England Club.

‘When do you think it is going to stop raining?’

‘Where is the nearest laundrette?’

‘Can you sew on my trouser buttons?’

Believe it or not theses were some of the questions asked at the Wimbledon Tennis Tournament information desks, run by WVS/WRVS between 1947 and 2004.

The All England Club allowed the organisation to hold its own annual Lawn Tennis Competition on the courts as a reward for manning the information desks. As well as answering questions on a range of subjects there were many other situations to deal with including reuniting lost children with their parents and even managers with tennis players. Volunteers also had the opportunity to watch matches on Centre Court and Court One during their breaks though they rarely watched a whole match as a volunteer wrote, ‘work must come first’.

During the 1980s one volunteer kept a record of her experiences of a week at Wimbledon. She wrote about a whole range of things including what she ate, there seems to have been a lot of avocado! On Tuesday 2nd June 1985 she wrote:

‘Panic at 6.50 when Leconte’s Manager came asking where he could get hold of Leconte’s coach who was somewhere within the rabbit warren, being interviewed by French Radio … after much phoning he eventually got hold of him’.

At the beginning of May I went to talk to Maureen Jones as part of Voices of Volunteering who was a WRVS volunteer on the Wimbledon Information Desks between 1982 and 1992. You can listen to a clip about one of her experiences at Wimbledon below.

Voices of Volunteering: 75 Years of Citizenship is an exciting new project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund which is collecting the memories and stories of long serving WVS/WRVS volunteers. Our volunteers are also involved, collecting oral histories in their local areas from WVS/WRVS volunteers. We hope to use these stories to inspire younger generations to volunteer through schools resources on volunteering and citizenship.

Posted by Jennifer Hunt at 00:00 Monday, 23 June 2014.

Labels: Wimbledon, WVS, WRVS, Tennis, Voices of Volunteering