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Heritage Bulletin blog

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I'm fine thanks!

Today I thought I would share with you all a poem that one of the volunteers found this morning and had them all chuckling away at how true it was. It was written by a member of the WRVS CAMEO. Luncheon Club, Lytham St. Annes for their Christmas party in 1973. The club was run for the physically handicapped and elderly people of the town. Its name means ‘Come And Meet Each Other’

I'M FINE, THANKS!

There is nothing the matter with me,
I'm as healthy as can be,
I have arthritis in both my knees
And when I talk, I talk with a wheeze;
My pulse is weak and my blood is thin
But, I'm awfully good for the shape I'm in.
Arch supports I have for my feet
Or I wouldn't be able to be on the street,
Sleep is denied me every night,
But every morning I find I'm all right.
My memory is failing, my head's in a spin
But I'm awfully well for the shape I'm in.

The moral is this, as this tale I unfold,
That for you and me who are growing old,
It's better to say ''I'm fine" with a grin,
Than to let folks know the shape we are in.
How do I know that my youth is all spent?
Well, my "get up and go" has" got up and went",
But I don't really mind when I think with a grin
Of all the grand places my "get-up" has been.

Old age is golden, I have heard it said,
But sometimes I wonder as I get into bed,
With my ears in a drawer, my teeth in a cup,
My eyes on the table for when I wake up;
Ere sleep comes to me - I say to myself
Is there anything else I should lay on the shelf?

When I was young my slippers were red,
I could kick my heels right over my head,
When I grew older my slippers were blue,
But I still could dance the whole night through.
Now I'm old - my slippers are black,
I walk to the store and puff my way back,
I get up each morning and dust off my wits,
Pick up the papers and read the Obits.,
If my name is still missing, I know I'm not dead
So I get a good breakfast and go back to bed.

Posted by Matthew McMurray, Royal Voluntary Service Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 24 August 2015.

Labels: Old age, Poem, Lytham, memory, teeth, old age, slippers

The conservation problems of Molly Blake!

This week I thought I would bring you something a little different from the ordinary.

As regular readers of this blog may know I have been (for nearly two years now, in between other things) working my way through and digitising for preservation purposes copies of our WVS/WRVS Bulletin. I have now got to the 1970s and the issues from these years are dominated by the beautiful illustrations of Molly Blake.

Molly worked for WRVS for many years in the property department at our offices in Old Park Lane, London, but also provided illustrations for posters, books, and not infrequently on her memos.

Not only do we have the published versions of her illustrations, but also some of the originals. One might naturally assume that the originals will be better than the printed versions, but this as you will see is not the case.

Like many artists and illustrators (myself included, I was an archaeological illustrator in a former life) we cheat a lot of the time. Molly’s drawings, usually in pen and ink on drawing film or paper provide an interesting example of the ravages of time, on both ink and glue. Changes to drawings, like in the example below, often involved drawing a new character and then literally pasting it with glue into the scene. The completed drawing could them be copied by the printer and it would look like a seamless illustration done all in one.

Unfortunately in the 40 odd years since these illustrations were done the glue has yellowed, ruining the illusion and in some cases the characters are falling out of their scenes as the glue has become brittle and ineffective. The other issue is bleeding of the ink, as you can see below, where the illustrations have got damp, not being stored in the best conditions for much of their life.

 

Printed copy from the WRVS Magazine

Original version, with bleeding ink

We are doing our best to preserve these precious illustrations for the future and properly packaged and stored hopefully the ink won't bleed anymore, the glue though is another problem!

I hope you liked this brief look at Molly’s work, and hopefully I can bring you some more in the future.

All illustrations copyright © Molly Blake.

Posted by Matthew McMurray, Royal Voluntary Service Archivist at 09:00 Tuesday, 18 August 2015.

Labels: Washing up , WRVS, Molly Blake, Heritage Bulletin Blog, Disabled, Conservation, Illustations, Drawings, WRVS Bulletin

Spinach and beet - Part 14

This week's Diary of a Centre Organiser comes from the WVS Bulletin, November 1951

Thursday

Matron is always glad when a young son or daughter, nephew or niece, accompanies one or more of our Trolley Shop team on their weekly rounds at the Old People’s Hospital. The patients enjoy seeing the children and one of them, 86 year old Mr Croke, gives great joy as a rule by moving sideways on his water-bed so that a glup-glup noise is made as he rocks the contents. Today, however, no smile broke the solemnity of a young visitor’s face when Mr Croke did his trick. Instead, overwhelmed with curiosity, the small boy took a step forward and asked anxiously : “If I put my finger in your mouth, would I feel the water?”

Friday

Have not yet found a niche in W.V.S. for Miss Pheckless. Had wondered whether she could deliver some of our Meals on Wheels, but my eye happened to light on an entry for August (when I was away) in our office Day Book which read : “Police called to ask us to remove some containers which had been standing outside No 5 London Street (an empty, boarded-up house) for some days and which were causing annoyance to the neighbours. Sent Miss Brown to collect them.” A later entry stated : “Miss Brown reported the containers were without lids, were buzzing with flies and smelling violently. Have traced that the meals were left by Miss Pheckless instead of at No 5 London Road.” Felt ashamed of myself for not reading the August entries before: what is the use of keeping a Day Book if nobody reads it? Was glad to discover due apologies had been sent to No 5 London Road.

Recipe

Tunny Fish en Casserole

1 medium size tin tunny fish
1 medium size onion (chopped)
3 packets potato crisps
Pepper and salt
1 tin mushroom soup

Line a casserole dish with one packet of potato crisps. Break the tunny fish into small pieces. Place part of it in the casserole, then a small quantity of the chopped onion; repeat until supply of tunny fish and onion are exhausted. Pour into the casserole the tin of soup (which has previously been heated) and put into a moderate oven for about half an hour. Cover the top with a layer of potato crisps, return to the oven for another ten minutes, garnish with parsley and serve.

Posted by Matthew McMurray, Royal Voluntary Service Archivist at 00:00 Tuesday, 11 August 2015.

Labels: WVS, WRVS, RVS, heritage Bulletin Blog, Hospital , Old people, Meals on Wheels , recipe, Tunny Fish casserole, Trolley Shop

Anyone who had a heart... Gives us a hand

I have returned to work this morning (from a wonderful holiday) to the sad news that the great singer and entertainer Cilla Black has died and I thought I would make a small tribute .

Back in 1998 Cilla was an ambassador for WRVS in our diamond anniversary year and helped us by supporting our give us a hand Campaign. The campaign sought to encourage people to volunteer with WRVS and to lend a hand in their local communities. A number of celebrities pledged their support by drawing around their hands, cutting them out and sending them to us to hang on a tree. You can read more about the campaign and see some of the celebrity hands on our timeline.

Cilla helped us launch the campaign at the Waldorf Hotel in London along with our chairman Lady Elizabeth Toulson and Cilla presented two of the volunteers who attended with a bottle of champagne! John and Mary Maisey, who volunteered at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, spent the first night of their honeymoon at the Waldorf in 1968 and hadn’t been back since!

Thank you Cilla.

Posted by Matthew McMurray, Royal Voluntary Service Archivist at 09:30 Monday, 03 August 2015.

Labels: Give us a hand, Cilla Black, Campaign, WRVS, Women's Royal Voluntary Service