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National Potato Day (USA)



The potato is probably one of the most used and versatile vegetables in the world. On Saturday 19th it is National Potato Day in the USA on 7th October it will be National Potato Day in the Ireland and in 2018 UK National Potato day will be 26th January. So instead of having to wait till next year I thought this week we would celebrate with the USA sharing a recent and interesting find by the Archivist in the Miscellaneous Memoranda files on Queen’s Messenger Convoys; WVS Food Department potato recipes.



Potato Pastry

Cook and mash potatoes thoroughly.
The best method is to bake the potatoes in their jackets, then remove the insides for use in pastry. By this means they are completely dry, and make a more satisfactory pastry than when the potatoes are moistened by steaming or boiling.

6 lbs. flour.
3 lbs. potatoes.
3 lbs. fat (as much margarine as possible).
Salt

Cheese Potatoes

Large Potatoes.
Grated Cheese.
A little milk.
Seasoning.

Bake the .potatoes in their skins. When cooked, split open, scoop out- the insides and mix with grated cheese and a little milk and seasoning. Stir over a low fire and then replace mixture inside the potatoes. Put under the grill or in the oven for a few moments-before serving.

Casserole of Potato

1 oz. dripping. 1/2 pint stock or milk. 1 egg. 1 lb. potatoes, 1 lb. carrots. 1 oz. oatmeal.

Scrub the potatoes and boil them gently in a very little water. When they are nearly cooked, drain off the liquid reserving it for stock. Let the potatoes finish cooking in their own steam covering closely with a folded cloth under the lid and standing at the side of the stove until floury. Remove the skins and mash well. Add the beaten egg and mash well. Grease a cake tin and coat it with brown breadcrumbs. Press in the mashed potatoes to form a thick lining to the tin. Bake in a hot oven for 20 minutes. Meanwhile dice the carrots, having 15 minutes and mix them with-a sauce made from the fat, oatmeal and liquid. Season and heat the mixture. When the potato casserole is cooked, turn it out and fill it with the carrot mixture. Place it in the oven for a few minutes and serve piping hot.


WVS Bulletin March 1941

Pink Potatoes


1 lb. potatoes
2 medium sized raw beetroots. 1 oz. margarine,
1 tablespoonful milk.

Boil the beetroots whole until tender (about 2 hours) taking care not to break the skins. When cooked skin them quickly and mash to a pulp and pass them through a sieve. In the meantime the potatoes should have been scraped and boiled in their skins- and when cooked peel and mash with margarine and milk. Mix potato and beetroot, together until thoroughly blended. Season with pepper and salt, put into a vegetable dish, cover and reheat in oven for a few moments.

Sausage rolls

Prepare potato pastry and roll it out in a long strip - about 4-5 inches wide. Place skinned sausage Or sausage meat down centre of pastry. Season. Moisten edges and fold pastry over the sausages. Cut into individual sausage rolls and mark with a fork or knife. Bake in a hot oven for about 20/30 minutes.

Skinned sausages or sausage meat.
Potato Pastry.
Seasoning.

Potato Scones

4. oz. Mashed potatoes.6 oz. Plain flour. teaspoonful salt.
2 level teaspoonful-baking powder, 2 oz. fat.
1/2 - 2/3 cupful of milk.

Sieve the flour and salt and baking-powder into a basin and rub in fat. Stir in potatoes until well mixed. Add sufficient milk to make a stiff dough. Turn on to lightly floured board. Knead lightly and roll to half inch thickness. Cut into small rounds, glaze top with a little milk and bake on a greased baking sheet in a hot oven for a quarter of an hour.

More recipes and stories like the one below from October 1943 can be found in the Bulletin; some of the Miscellaneous Memoranda files were recently catalogued and the catalogue entries can be found by searching Archive Online. For more help searching our records please see the guide to archive online or contact our enquiry service.

Let us know if you have a go at any of our recipes.


Posted by Jennifer Hunt, Deputy Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 14 August 2017. 0 Comments

Labels: WVS, Miscellaneous Memoranda, Queen's Messenger Convoys, WVS Food Department, recipies, Potato

My Archive Journey Part One

Learning to deal with an accession at the Royal Voluntary Service

Following my initial introduction to the wide array of resources held by the Royal Voluntary Service Archive & Heritage Collection, and the subsequent publication of my first Heritage Bulletin blog at the beginning of February 2017, my primary experience of an accession to the archive came in the form of a collection accumulated by the leader of the ‘Ebley Silver Threads over 60's Club’, Mrs Mary Curtis. This submission to the archive followed directly on from an interview for the ‘Voices of Volunteering’ project conducted by the Deputy Archivist, Jennifer Hunt, with Mary late in 2015.

The collection, which had been maintained by Mary between 1962 and 2008, first in her capacity as a member of WVS and subsequently as the club leader after 1966, had arrived at the archive in January 2016 following an enquiry from the custodian of the documents. It came in a hefty and bulging briefcase, along with two large and very full cardboard boxes. My first task was consequently to unpack the collection, whilst maintaining the original order, so that a preliminary assessment of the contents could be made.

Initially it had been thought that the collection was comprised mainly of the photographs and the personal records and mementoes of Mary in her association with the WRVS (now Royal Voluntary Service) and the Ebley Silver Threads club, but during this review it soon became apparent that rather than a personal collection, it would be better categorised as the records of a local office. The Ebley Silver Threads over 60's Club’ had been formed in 1966 by Mary and a few other members of the WRVS upon their recognition that no social group existed for the older members of their local community in the urban region of Stroud, Gloucestershire. Whilst identified as a local club by its members, it was nevertheless part of the wide range of older persons’ welfare work conducted by the organisation, belonging to the service originally known nationwide as the ‘Darby and Joan Clubs’.

As a consequence included amongst the documents were several WVS Circular Notices such as, "Model Rules for the Constitution of a Local Darby and Joan Club run by WVS", “"WVS Darby and Joan Clubs, Notes for the Guidance of Leaders" and “WVS Insurance in Darby and Joan Clubs”. In addition there were blank ‘Older People's Club’ membership cards which recorded subscription payments, and a WRVS newssheet on “Meals on Wheels and Lunch Clubs”.

At the club level there was a minute book of Committee Meetings and the Annual General Meetings between 1971 and 2008, extracts from the financial records and statements, in addition to copies of the letters and correspondence sent and received by Mary in her role as club leader. Whilst the bulk of the collection related to the holidays and activities organised for the club members, and was made up in particular of the photographs taken of the group, there were also records of the recognition paid and awards given to Mary by the WRVS and her local community for her work and commitment to the older citizens in Ebley and the surrounding area.

Overall there was no doubt that this collection fitted with the collection policy of the archive and that it would be a valuable addition. As a consequence a gift agreement was therefore sought from the custodian to allow work to proceed to incorporate it into the archive.

Look out for my next blog in September when I will describe my next stage of the journey: learning to catalogue the collection.

Posted by Elaine Titcombe, Archive & Heritage Collection Volunteer at 09:00 Monday, 07 August 2017. 0 Comments

Labels: Accession, WVS, WRVS, Gloucestershire, Stroud, Darby & Joan

Navigating through the Narrative Reports

As already discussed in a previous blog, Updating the online catalogue, we have just released the digitised copies of the diaries (1938-1942) from the Hidden Histories of a Million Wartime Women project collectively known as the Narrative Reports. To ensure that everybody has the opportunity to read them, this trusty guide should hopefully help you navigate your way through the thousands of diaries that are available to read online. Before discovering this endless historical source, I advise topping up the midnight oil!

The first stage is to go to the Archive Online page. I would then suggest clicking on Advanced Search as this will help you find your area of interest a lot easier. Due to the geographical nature of the collection, the easiest way to find a diary that will interest you is to search for a town, city or county. Enter your chosen area into the keyword(s) section, (Bath, for example) and then select Narrative Report from the drop down menu in the category section. After clicking search at the bottom of the page your choice of centre should hopefully appear.



If your centre of choice does appear in the search result, it will be listed chronologically. It is important to remember that not all centres were established in 1938, so some places may not have records from the earliest years. Nevertheless, click on your chosen year of preference (I am sure you will end up reading every year anyway) and scroll down to the section named Media Download.

This is where you will find the wonderful stories of the WVS. Simply click on the PDF link and a document containing all the reports for that year will be available to read as many times as you like. Each report has been individually photographed and cropped using our editing software to ensure that you get the best reading experience. I hope that this guide will help you navigate through the abundant memories of the WVS. If you are experiencing any problems or you are have difficulty accessing the Narrative Reports, please contact our enquiry service. We are only too happy to help you read though this unique collection of stories and volunteer experiences.

To help encourage you to start perusing the wealth of the Narrative Reports, here is an interesting little snippet describing the instructions for air raid precautions from a local Housewives’ Section meeting that took place in the city of Bath on 13th July 1942.



Posted by Jacob Bullus. Archives Assistant at 09:00 Monday, 31 July 2017. 0 Comments

Labels: Narrative Report, Bath, WVS, Archive Online

The value of volunteering in archives

“Too many People think of volunteer service as cheap labour. Real voluntary service is nothing of kind. It is the gift of one’s skill, one’s time, and one’s energy, given by an understanding human being for a special reason”

Lady Reading, It's the Job that Counts I,1953

Five/six years ago I wrote and submitted my dissertation for my Msc Econ in Archive Administration. The focus was the value of volunteers in county and community archives in North West England and how archives could or couldn’t conform to Government policy. This was at a time when the MLA had just become defunct and ideas like the Big Society (remember that?) were floating around. Five/six years is a long time and many things have changed included my move from an interest in county/community archives to specialist ones. However the value that volunteers provide to archives hasn’t.

Here at the Royal Voluntary Service Archive & Heritage collection we have a team of volunteers who come on a regular basis and take on roles such as: repackaging, digitisation, cataloguing, occasionally giving talks to local groups and accessioning to name a few. Everything they do helps to make our work a success and volunteers improve access and knowledge about material; work which staff cannot complete is taken care of by volunteers; the preservation needs of material are met by volunteers and the archives is promoted to other members of the public.

Volunteers also bring specialist knowledge for example skills from previous professions such as specific knowledge of photography or computer skills. In our case most volunteers bring knowledge of the history of WVS/WRVS/Royal Voluntary Service through their own experiences of services such as meals on Wheels, Books on wheels, being District Organisers, Vice-chairmen or office secretaries. This helps us to understand the context of the material they are working with and allows them to learn more about their different interests in the charity. Volunteering doesn’t just benefit the Archives it also advantageous to the volunteers.

Back in 2011 I interviewed several volunteers about their different roles in archives this included people who were retired, unemployed, seeking work experience or in the case of community archives they were volunteers interested in telling the story of a certain group in society. While they helped the archives volunteering also gave them something. This can be split into two categories educational benefits and social benefits. I concluded that in county and community archives education came second and social came first as primarily volunteers went to the archives to socialise with other people.

Here at the Royal Voluntary Service Archive & Heritage Collection most of our volunteers are retired and occasionally we have student and graduate volunteers however it seems there is more of a balance between education (Knowledge and skills) and the social aspect. In just over five years I have seen volunteers learn new skills such as cataloguing, blog writing and handling or other preservation skills. Many of our volunteers who meet on the same day have also formed friendships and meet outside the Archive. We have also celebrated their achievements and time with service awards.

So remember volunteering is a two way thing volunteers give archives their valuable time, knowledge and skills, in return volunteers can make new friends and learn new skills. Also archives will always need volunteers without them we would not have been so successful in many projects.

Posted by Jennifer Hunt, Deputy Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 24 July 2017. 0 Comments

Labels: volunteers, archives, skills, education, social, volunteering

Game Set Match

After the excitement and perhaps in some cases disappointment of the results of the Wimbledon finals over the weekend I thought you would be interested in reading about WVS/WRVS’s involvement with Wimbledon. A past blog three years ago talked about volunteers running the information desks during the competition in July. This service was in return for the use of the courts for a tournament run in September originally organised by the WVS Club.

On 4th June 1947 the Queen Mother opened the WVS Club at 41 Cadogan Square London/. The club was open to members and ex-members who could apply to join for an annual subscription of £2 2s 2d with a £3 3s 0d entrance fee. It was to be a central meeting place for all members and organised the WVS Tennis Tournament from September 1948 till it closed in 1955.

First held in 1948 the Tennis Tournament was held in September at Wimbledon on the first day WVS supported an American Tournament and on the second day members were invited to play in a ladies doubles competition. In November the following report was printed in the WVS Bulletin:

Although the WVS closed the Tennis continued into the 1980s and possibly 1990s though the last mention in the Archives is the WRVS Association Newsletter No.18 May 1983.

Posted by Jennifer Hunt, Deputy Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 17 July 2017. 0 Comments

Labels: Tennis, WVS, WRVS, Club, Wimbledon

Updating the online catalogue

It’s been a while since we updated the online catalogue but never fear the archive team have been working hard to tackle the backlog and bring you more interesting and exciting records.

Central Registry

Cataloguing is one of my favourite activities as the Deputy Archivist I have been able to work on a few different projects over the past twelve months. The first was cataloguing the Central Registry files relating to the Good Neighbours scheme. The files contain information about how the scheme was set up in each region of WRVS in the 1970s and policy for the service. You can find them be searching Good Companions in the Keyword field (the schemes original name) and Central Registry in the category field of the advanced search.

Circular Notices

Another series which I catalogued in six weeks (one day per week) and thanks to funding from Leeds Beckett University was the Circular Notices. This is a series of letters/memorandum circulated to regional administrators, county and county borough offices and all members from 1938-1974. They cover a wide range of topics from the ARP Animals Committee, Assistance for evacuees & Homeless Persons, WRVS Information Desks-Wimbledon and the Books On Wheels Film. In fact most of the services you associate with WVS/WRVS plus a few more can be found in these files. Search Circular Notice in the category field of the advanced search.

Miscellaneous Memoranda

Our Archivist spends most of his time working hard to promote and develop the archive however during those rare quite periods he does get the opportunity to catalogue. This time he has chosen the ominous Miscellaneous Memoranda collection (yes I know a naughty word in archives). This series is made up of documents detailing wartime and post war work of WVS including the Personal Parcels Scheme, The Volunteer Car Pool and Rationing - Notes Compiled for Mrs Roosevelt. Search Miscellaneous Memoranda in the category field of the advanced search.


Narrative Reports

I can’t believe it’s been over 3 years since I was working on the project to catalogue all the reports written between 1938 and 1965. Now because of the wonderful support of 705 Kickstarter backers the reports written between 1938 and 1942 our Archives Assistant has now digitised and published the reports with their catalogue records. They can be downloaded by clicking on the red PDF icon where available. More Narrative Reports will be added to the catalogue by April 2018. You can access digital copies of the narrative Reports through our online catalogue searching your local area or county.

Publications

In March we brought you the blog What the does the Deputy Archivist get up to on Wednesdays? This discussed the work that went into cataloguing our large and varied collection of publications. Over the course of nearly 80 years Royal Voluntary Service has been producing publications to advertise their services and appeal for volunteers. The catalogue records for over 1000 leaflets, booklets, posters, cards, bookmarks and certificates are now available to search online. Using the advanced search look for services in the keywords field or the different types of publication in the category field.


The Archive team including our dedicated volunteers will continue to catalogue more material including photographs and local office material, so watch this space. If you have any quires about material in the collection please contact our enquiry service.

Posted by Jennifer Hunt, Deputy Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 10 July 2017. 0 Comments

Labels: WVS, WRVS, Archive , Catalogue, Record

Tothill Street our first Headquarters

WRVS had a number of headquarters over the years including Park lane, Brixton, Milton Hill, Cardiff and not forgetting Scottish HQ in Edinburgh. However WVS’s (1938-1966) Headquarters was 41 Tothill Street now the Conrad London St James. This was the office where the hard work really began when Lady Reading sat down in a tiny office in Tothill Street in Whitehall, London; crammed in with four other handpicked women she laid the foundations of what would quickly become the largest volunteering organisation in British history. I wonder if they ever thought this organisation would still be around today.


The Women’s Voluntary Services for Air Raid Precautions was founded and took up residence at 41 Tothill Street on 16th May 1938.  Originally this was a single room secured by Lady Reading’s Secretary and former Civil Servant in the Ministry of Labour Mary Smieton. The WVS Offices expanded quickly to occupy the whole 4th Floor. A reception was established on the ground floor and not long after a shop for the purchase of WVS uniform. Over the years the shop window was used for a number of displays including Make do and Mend in 1943 as seen in the image above.By the end of the War there were 176 members working at Headquarters.

Over the years many other WVS activities took place at Tothill Street including:

  • The labelling Princess Elizabeth gift food parcels distributed to the needy as a wedding present from the future Queen in 1948.
  • Collecting gifts including a Sheffield Plate Soup Tureen for Canadian Flood Relief in 1950

  • One in Five introductory talks in November 1958, the department was established by Lady Lucas Tooth at Headquarters in 1955.

  • The sorting of magazines for Services Welfare, as part of the books and magazines adoption scheme in 1962.

WVS Headquarters moved from Tothill Street to Park Lane in May 1966 the year they were renamed Women’s Royal Voluntary Service (WRVS). At the time there were 361 members of staff working at Headquarters more than double the numbers in 1945.

Today we are delighted to honour our founder, Lady Reading, with an English Heritage blue plaque in London at The Conrad London St James (formally the WVS Headquarters 41 Tothill Street). Today is also the digital launch of all those fascinating hidden histories of one million wartime women which we have been digitising since September. Follow us on Twitter to find out whats happening at todays launch event.

Posted by Jennifer Hunt, Deputy Archivist at 10:00 Tuesday, 04 July 2017. 0 Comments

Labels: Million Women, Lady Reading, WVS, Tothill Street, Headquarters, WRVS

Access to Archives: Finding aids

As the Deputy Archivist I am constantly looking at ways to make our collections more accessible. At Royal Voluntary Service we have run a small number of digitisation projects and opened an enquiry Service (running since 2013) but there are large parts of our collection which remain uncatalogued and only accessible to the Archives team. One way of tackling this is to create finding aids; they are defined as a document containing detailed information about a specific collection of papers or records within an archive. Finding aids are used by researchers to determine whether information within a collection is relevant to their research. Thus over the years we have used collections to create a number of fact sheets to help researchers gain an understanding of different services we have provided since 1938.

The fact sheets on our main site cover a number of topics including:

Health and Hospital Work 1938-2013 – this is a comprehensive look at the work of WVS and WRVS in hospitals since it was founded. Research to compile this document included Central Registry files, publications local office collection accessions and Narrative Reports.

Roll of Honour and History of the Roll of Honour – the former document is a colour copy of the beautifully illustrated book which contains the names of 245 WVS members who were killed during the Second World War. The latter explains its history and compilation, providing you with access to the history of this very important Roll of Honour.

WVS Uniform – on our website you can choose two ways to learn about the history of our uniform and how Royal Voluntary Service has chosen to represent itself. There is the more traditional factsheet containing a number of pictures of wartime uniform with descriptions and it uses publications to provide details on the costs. There is also a video which explores all uniforms from WVS for ARP to Royal Voluntary Service a quick guide with images, publications and uniforms all with video commentary to help you move from Green and red to orange and purple and then back to green and red.

There are also fact sheets on:

• The origins of Meals on Wheels

• Darby and Joan Clubs

• One in Five

• Salvage on the Home Front

• Story of WVS Bristol

• Origins of WVS

• Narrative Reports

• Books on WVS and WRVS

And copies of documents

• Ten Years Work (1938-48)

• WVS Housewives Service

There are also some shorter one page factsheets on our Voices of Volunteering schools resources pages which can help researchers to understand a topic before going to look at the online catalogue for more information about their chosen subject. These factsheets include:

• Books on Wheels

• Clothing Depots

• Darby & Joan Clubs

• Good neighbours

• Hospital canteens

• Lunch Clubs

• Meals on Wheels

• Psychiatric Hospitals

• Services Welfare

• Transport

All our factsheets aim to provide you with source material which isn’t available or easily accessible in other forms. We hope you will take a look, absorb the information and perhaps start some research of your own into our history. If you have any specific questions get in touch with our remote enquiry service.

Posted by Jennifer Hunt, Deputy Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 26 June 2017. 0 Comments

Labels: Archives, Fact Sheets, WVS, WRVS, Royal Voluntary Service

Hungarian Refugees in Yorkshire

WVS Bulletin December 1956

This week is Refugee Week, it takes place every year around the globe to celebrate World Refugee Day on 20th June.  In the past we have shared many stories with you about WVS and WRVS’s involvement in refugee crisis across the world from Belgian and French refugees during World War II to Ugandan Asians and Vietnamese in the 1970s. This week we thought we’d bring you a different story that of Hungarian Refugees who came to the UK in 1956.

On 23rd October 1956 the Hungarian people rose up against the government of the Hungarian People’s Republic. It spread quickly across the country but was eventually crushed on 10th November. Thousands of those who revolted fled the country as refugees 21,500 came to the UK although 5,500 later re-emigrated. Ready to assist the refugees was WVS who took full responsibility for clothing, arranged hospitality in people’s homes and worked in reception centres and hostels.

There are many records on the efforts of WVS in 1956 and 1957 to help the refugees on a national level. However there are also local reports two which come from cities still known for their work to help refugees, Sheffield and Leeds.

Leeds was involved in various different aspects of relief for refugees including sorting 400 blankets, housing students at the university, assisting refugees with employment and clothing. One story particularly stands out as a huge act of kindness.

Sheffield was also very busy working with Hungarians arriving in the city they were initially involved in clothing even before Hungarians arrived. Sheffield United Tours took clothing from the WVS to Austria along with one ton of sugar given to Sheffield WVS by Bassetts Ltd. Some refugees were brought back on returning coaches and clothing still remained and issue.  

In 1957 WVS Sheffield was mostly concerned with billeting taking on a role which they had been responsible for during the War. This included private billets as well as hostels for 64 Hungarians, by June 1957 29 had left Sheffield. One boy had returned to Hungary and three people had left for Canada.

Aid continued for many years in Report on 25 years work 1938 -1963 the following was written:

“Most Hungarians have now become fully integrated into the life of the country, but a few still live in these communal billets, while many others continue to depend on WVS for advice in connection with their families and homes.”

Posted by Jennifer Hunt, Deputy Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 19 June 2017. 0 Comments

Labels: Refugee, Hungarian, WVS, 1956, Clothing , Billeting

Nettles and Broken Records

Nettles and broken gramophone records, just a couple of the things we don’t search for very often in the collection however this month both cropped up in our Twitter and Facebook accounts. Both were collected by WVS during the war, nettles for medicinal purposes as much needed herbs and gramophone records for recycling; at the time they would have called this salvage. Inspired by our social media posts and some comments from our followers I decided to embark on some research in the collection. I wanted to find out about Royal Voluntary Service’s relationship with nettles and gramophone records. This is what I found

Nettles

If you type in the word nettle or nettles into the catalogue you will find 3 mentions in the Bulletin between 1943 and 1969.

In 1942 WVS started to collect much needed herbs for medicinal purposes to assist with the war effort. In that year, nationally, they collected 60 tons of the herbaceous perennial flowering plant. Along with dandelion leaves, burdock leaves/roots and elder flowers to name a few it was considered to be of secondary purpose but I’m sure they were collected with just as much enthusiasm as rose hips or valerian root. Nettles along with some other herbs don’t really get a mention after the war however they are referred to in the Bulletin in August 1960.

The article A London Herb Garden written by a Bon Viveur describes in detail the plans for a garden at a decrepit Georgian house in Blackheath. Part of the article discusses what the herbs they grow will be used for. This includes Cumberland and Westmoreland herb puddings a recipe which includes bistort and “nettles of course!” Today, I don’t think we always associate nettles as being useful or something we would consume and of course they can always feature in a well told story like MUM’S STAND-IN from March 1969.

[I] hoped that the recipients would tolerate my inexperience and help me out, which of course they did and if they felt any surprise that their regular helper wasn't there they never expressed it and perhaps enjoyed initiating a young stranger in the rituals of delivering Meals on Wheels. First problem-to find the right door-at No. 5 . . . Place. The slippery brick path lies between nettles on one side and rows of dustbins on the other side and the latch of the gate round the bend to the left is held by string, but the peeling kitchen door is ajar and the matches actually are behind the Ajax, and Mrs. D. seems really pleased to see the steaming steak and kidney pie going into the oven and the fruit and custard on a plate on the table. … But it is very hard to get away quickly from the flats for Mrs. F. is giving the baker's roundsman a cup of tea and she hurries to find another cup for me, but eventually reconciles herself merely to pressing two peppermints into my hand to help me on the way. Bang goes my diet!

Gramophone Records


This segment from an Oxford Narrative Report mentions broken gramophone records being collected for salvage. According to other sources this was for recycling into new records. However a quick search for gramophone records in the collection shows the WVS didn’t just collect broken ones for salvage. Those in Good condition were obtained for troop canteens, book depots and a Gramophone lending library at Scottish Headquarters.

You can read the rest of the Article from the Bulletin September 1944 online.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this odd assortment of stories about two completely unrelated topics and perhaps you’ll be inspired to conduct your own search of the online catalogue. Happy hunting!

Posted by Jennifer Hunt, Deputy Archivist at 09:00 Monday, 12 June 2017. 0 Comments

Labels: Nettles, Gramophone Records, WVS, Royal Voluntary Service, Catalogue, Archive

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