What we're saying

Computer lesson at WRVS Hanley Centre

Find out what we're saying  - where we share our thoughts and opinions and make comments on issues facing older people, volunteering and preventative care.

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“I don’t know what I’d do without him”

Betty and TonyMeet Betty, 86, who relies on Tony from our Cumbria Transport Service to help her get out and about and alleviate her isolation.

“I don’t know what I’d do without Tony. I wouldn’t be able to get out of the house. He’s absolutely wonderful; he’s always reliable and I think the service is marvellous.

“My pleasures were taken away from me when I reached old age. I used to do a lot of walking around the lakes, mountain climbing and ballroom dancing. I can’t do any of that now. I rely on Tony to get me out of the house.

“He takes me to my luncheon clubs, the community centre and to do my weekly shop. He’s available at short notice and is so reliable. Before Tony, it was terrible for me - not to be able to get out.”

Betty and Tony

At least three times a week, Tony, 60, a Royal Voluntary Service volunteer, drives to Betty’s house and takes her to where she needs to go. If it’s a hospital or doctor’s appointment, Tony waits with her before taking her home again.

"I know all the shortest routes for my ‘customers’ and always make sure I’m on time. There’s nothing hard about volunteering; I have my regular bookings and I do the one off appointments. I enjoy it. It brings me a sense of purpose."

Tony, Royal Voluntary Service Volunteer
Thanks to funds raised by players of People’s Postcode Lottery Royal Voluntary Service volunteers are able to help more people like Betty across Great Britain.

Posted by Betty at 00:00 Wednesday, 26 October 2016. 0 Comments

Labels: Royal Voluntary Service, volunteering

Age Is Just A Number

Older people paintOn Older People’s Day, we want to champion achievement as we age. Many assume that our greatest success happens in our youth but these incredible accomplishments prove that age is just a number.

Publishing novels


J. R. R. Tolkien published the first volume of his famous epic fantasy series, “The Lord of the Rings” when he was 62-years-old. The book is thought to be one of the best-selling novels of all time, with over 150 million copies sold worldwide. The oldest recorded author was Louise Delany who published The Delany Sister’s Book of Everyday Wishom when she was 105-years-old in October 1994.

Winning medals


Oscar Swahn, oldest Olympic medalistYouth may be associated with sport but this bucks the trend. Oscar Swahn won Silver at the Antwerp Olympics in 1920 aged 72 for shooting. He won his first gold medal at the 1908 Olympic Games in London and collected three gold, one silver and two bronze medals in his career.

Performing gymnastics


At 86, Johanna Quaas from Germany was a regular competitor in amateur gymnastics competitions in Germany when her World Record as oldest gymnast was certified in 2012.

Graduating from university


Shigemi Hirata graduated from Kyoto University of Art and Design in Japan aged 96. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in March 2016.

Lucky in love


Age is nothing when it comes to love! The oldest recorded bride, Minnie Munro, married Dudley Reid, 83, at the age of 102-years-old at Point Clare in Australia in 1991 while Harry Stevens is recorded as the oldest bridegroom when he married Thelma Lucas, 84, when he was aged 103 in Wisconsin, USA.


Posted by Sarah Key at 00:00 Saturday, 01 October 2016. 0 Comments

Labels: Royal Voluntary Service, Older People's Day,

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